What You Ache For

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"

Do not teach your daughters to be ‘pretty.’

Do not entomb her in a pretty pink tower
and insist that only the degree of her physical appeal
may set her free.
Teach her to fight her way out,
to consume books and spit knowledge
to lesser boys who insist she is just beautiful
and nothing more.

Teach her to love her body
not to manipulate and put a price tag on herself
as a defined worth
she shall be immeasurable
she shall be more than this.

Do not let her break herself down
when the boy in kindergarden hits her
because he likes her.
What are you really teaching her?
Pain and love are not synonymous
neither are pretty and perfection.

Teach her to be kind
to be harsh
to be demure
to be wild
to be sensitive
to be thick-skinned

But good god,

Do not teach your daughters to be ‘pretty.’

"

- Michelle K., Do Not Teach Your Daughters to Be ‘Pretty’ (via creatingaquietmind)

(via creatingaquietmind)

"Always expecting this and expecting that. May I recommend serenity to you? A life that is burdened with expectations is a heavy life. Its fruit is sorrow and disappointment. Learn to be one with the joy of the moment."

- Douglas Adams, The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul (via creatingaquietmind)

(Source: lookingsmug, via creatingaquietmind)

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California
In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.
The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.
Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.”
In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.
Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.
In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today. California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.
Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”
Credit

"Trying to solve gender inequality in the workplace by telling women to be more confident is like re-arranging the deck chairs on the Titanic after it hit the iceberg. It may give the passengers something to do, but it definitely won’t stop the ship from sinking."

- Elizabeth Plank, It’s Not the ‘Confidence Gap’ – Here’s What’s Really Holding Women Back (via seriouslyamerica)

It's Not the 'Confidence Gap' – Here's What's Really Holding Women Back

(Source: seriouslyamerica)

"You’re going to meet many people with domineering personalities: the loud, the obnoxious, those that noisily stake their claims in your territory and everywhere else they set foot on. This is the blueprint of a predator. Predators prey on gentleness, peace, calmness, sweetness and any positivity that they sniff out as weakness. Anything that is happy and at peace they mistake for weakness. It’s not your job to change these people, but it’s your job to show them that your peace and gentleness do not equate to weakness. I have always appeared to be fragile and delicate but the thing is, I am not fragile and I am not delicate. I am very gentle but I can show you that the gentle also possess a poison. I compare myself to silk. People mistake silk to be weak but a silk handkerchief can protect the wearer from a gunshot. There are many people who will want to befriend you if you fit the description of what they think is weak; predators want to have friends that they can dominate over because that makes them feel strong and important. The truth is that predators have no strength and no courage. It is you who are strong, and it is you who has courage. I have lost many a friend over the fact that when they attempt to rip me, they can’t. They accuse me of being deceiving; I am not deceiving, I am just made of silk. It is they who are stupid and wrongly take gentleness and fairness for weakness. There are many more predators in this world, so I want you to be made of silk. You are silk."

- C. JoyBell C. (via creatingaquietmind)

feministsupernatural:

sandandglass:

[Source]

And no one is surprised.

(via seriouslyamerica)

circletines:

U EVER THINK ABOUT BOYS IN SUITS AND HOW NICE IT MAKES THEIR SHOULDERS LOOK AND HOW THE SLEEVES MAKE THEIR HANDS LOOK ALL BIG AND HOW THE COLLAR MAKES THEIR JAWLINE LOOK SO SHARP AND HOW THE JACKET FITS THEM TIGHT AT THE WAIST B O Y S

(Source: stephenhawqueen, via becausebooks)

satans-advocate:

sext: i want to pay bills and share household duties and approach our late 20’s in a financially and emotionally stable way with you

(via becausebooks)

thehidingcat:

stupidmiiverseposts:

There has only been five female characters comfirmed playable compared to fifteen male characters.

I’m amazed at those exact numbers because 33% is the point where men will start thinking there’s a majority of women in a group.

(via becausebooks)

"What’s the good of dragging up sufferings which are over, of being unhappy now just because you were then."

- Seneca (via creatingaquietmind)

(Source: life-itself-is-a-quotation, via creatingaquietmind)

A Difficult Miscarriage Made Worse by Hospital's Religious Restrictions on Care

bebinn:

Here’s how it goes:

A woman suffering a miscarriage goes to a Catholic hospital after her doctor tells her she needs a dilation and curettage (D&C) to stop the bleeding. Her doctor, afraid of attracting attention from the hospital’s Ethics Board, gives her a blood transfusion instead and sends her home to wait it out.

Twelve hours later, still bleeding, she’s back in the hospital. The hospital refuses to treat her for another seven hours, performing three or four ultrasounds to determine the fetus is dead - apparently, there’s plenty of time for religious technicalities when a woman is bleeding and risks deadly infection. She gets a second transfusion carrying antigens that put her next pregnancy at risk for sudden fetal death, and only then does she get the D&C to complete her miscarriage.

Her second pregnancy, thankfully, made it to term. However, thanks to the hospital’s incompetence, waiting to deliver spontaneously was too risky. She had to undergo a second C-section, which is a major abdominal surgery with its own risks and a long recovery time - not exactly ideal for a new mother of two.

Religious restrictions on health care put patients’ lives in danger. This is not moral or ethical. This is not good health care. This is shameful.

(via seriouslyamerica)

(Source: nnewgirl, via becausebooks)